The Beatles Model a Midlife Crisis Like a Boss: Use "Get Back" to get connected back to YOU.

Updated: Sep 22

If the Beatles can transition from "Help" to "Sgt. Pepper" to "Hey Jude" , I think we can take a lesson from them in how to manage our own authentic evolutions. Here are 10 ways to get you through to your genius level, your next creation, and greater self, by seeing how they got to that legendary roof top.


As a counselor and Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator, I focus alot of my work on helping folks navigate changes in life; from feeling stuck and wanting more, into new, exciting, and empowered next seasons. I teach the motto: "There is no shame in change!" And who better to learn about change then witnessing the many versions of The Beatles.


You'd probably never describe The Beatles as going through a midlife crisis. But the era of their career is a master class in beautiful evolution. Embracing every turning point. And owning every change, as a group, and for each of them as individuals. That's the magic of the midlife crisis.


You say you want a REVOLUTION?! Here is how to make one for yourself.


Tip #1 - Embrace YOUR evolution


The changes from “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” THRU “Sgt. Pepper” to “Let It Be” was ONLY 3 years in between each stage! And each stage of their evolution was so very unique.


Keep living and creating your life. Wanna try a new haircut, hobby, or career. Do you! There is no shame in change. And it’s ok to LOVE every stage. .



Tip #2 - Trying is going to be messy


Watching them throw in and throw out lyrics to songs I can sing in my sleep was so frustrating! How could they NOT know that “leads me to your door” is such a natural follow to “the long and winding road, that…”??? It was painful to watch them try and try to find just the right lyric.


It will be painful for us too, as we try new things to figure out the next thing that sings and rings in our soul.


"I'm only 49 years old. I'm still in the middle of this whole thing. I don't feel like it's finished at all. I'm still planning to write better songs.." – Paul McCartney

Tip #3 - Don't try to be Paul (or John, or George, or Ringo)


If everyone tried to be a lead guitarist or vocalist like Paul or John, we wouldn’t have that sweet lead guitar solo in “Let It Be”. And Ringo, just did his job. And did it well (love “Daytripper” - I know, different album but it’s a fave of mine!).


My point is, if you are too focused on comparing your gifts to the gifts of others, then the world never gets your unique contribution. And you will never feel the fulfillment and satisfaction of showing up and being known as you. Be YOU! It takes all kinds and the world needs YOU!


Tip #4 - Keep moving


Don’t wait to have every single step planned and perfect before you take action. The Beatles didn’t even know they would be on that infamous rooftop. Maybe a tv show or movie. Would it be an album? A concert? They didn’t know. They just knew they had to create.


Start with your intention and a target. Trust yourself and the stirring inside you. Decide. Take action. Then evaluate as you go. You’ll be living that wonderful life-ride, and you’ll land exactly where you need to be.


Tip #5 - Not everything will be "Hey Jude"


You can’t hit a home-run every time. Some song called “They Call Me Fuzz Face” ended up on the cutting room floor. Along with over 100 others! You try, and miss, and try again, and get closer, and keep trying, and suddenly….”naaaa naaa na, nanananaaaaa, nananaaaaa, heeey Jude” comes out. Even that is part genius, part gibberish.

Get comfortable with not being perfect all the time. What you’ll gain is progress, and eventually your own stroke of genius in the unique creation that is YOU.


“There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open up to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance.” - John Lennon


Tip #6 - We don't do it alone.


And I’m not just talking about the intimate circle of the Fab 4. They were surrounded by people who supported and informed them, questioned them, and challenged them. And loved them. People they looked to and leaned on.


Find (and develop) YOUR tribe. Make your connections in your intimate circle, social and community. If you act like you’re an island, you’ll end up feeling like one.


Tip #7 - Take Risks


They took a chance sharing the spotlight with an up-and-coming musician, Billy Preston. They risked being arrested by performing outside, on a roof. They moved production to a whole new building, in the middle of the process, in hopes to get better vibes and sound. Everyone has a lot to lose when we risk. Even the Beatles!


But it’s only when we risk and dare greatly, that we give ourselves the opportunity to gain greatly too! Fear could stop you. Courage moves in the face of fear. Where do you want to take some chances in your life? To dare greatly? And what could you gain by trying?


Tip #8 - You won't be able to do it ALL


Did you know the Beatles had to stop touring in order to MAKE the time to create this album? Stop touring?!?! I bet there were a ton of people extremely disappointed by that choice. But they did it. They made that choice, SO THAT they could have more time, energy and focus to create something new and fabulous. To honor that new creation stirring inside of them, just itching to get out.


You can’t do it all. Even if someone is disappointed by that fact, you can chose what is

essential that will get your time. Set your healthy boundaries and move into your intentions.


Tip #9 - Fight with integrity


I cannot say enough about this! GEORGE LEFT! Done. Took his guitar and went home. Done with this project (whatever the hell it was gonna be) AND The Beatles. What would you do? I think the typical response is something like…”well, screw him! We can do it without him. Who the hell does he think he is?!” These days I think we skip to being done, because it’s too hard to do anything else. To do things like direct communication, forgiveness, vulnerability, connections.


No one but the Fab 4 were in the room where it happened, but John, Paul and Ringo

reached out to George to talk, went to his house. Talked. And talked to a point where

George returned to finish the project with his bandmates. I imagine none of this process was easy for ANY of them. It takes courage to reach out, to talk, to forgive a walk out, to forgive the wounds that CAUSED a walk out, and to show enough love and grace to allow a return. THAT is freakin’ genius!


Tip #10 - Embrace necessary endings


The band of The Beatles had to end to get “Band on the Run,” “My Sweet Lord,” and “Imagine.” We can appreciate that thing